Last updated: April 24. 2014 7:24AM - 551 Views

Chief Technology Officer Jim Pepin, left, CIO Jim Bottum and Barr von Oehsen, executive director of Cyberinfrastructure Technology Integration, discuss plans for the network of facilitators.
Chief Technology Officer Jim Pepin, left, CIO Jim Bottum and Barr von Oehsen, executive director of Cyberinfrastructure Technology Integration, discuss plans for the network of facilitators.
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CLEMSON — The National Science Foundation has awarded Clemson University a $5.3 million grant to enable a national network of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure Research and Education Facilitators (ACI-REFs) to broaden the impact of advanced computing resources at campuses across the country.


Led by Clemson Chief Information Officer Jim Bottum as principal investigator, Barr von Oehsen will serve as the science and outreach lead, Jim Pepin will act as the technical integration lead, and Simon Appleford and Dustin Atkins will also serve on the project team at Clemson.


The project’s collaborating institutions include the University of Hawaii, the University of Southern California, the University of Utah, the University of Wisconsin and Harvard University.


The project, called the Advanced Cyberinfrastructure–Research and Educational Facilitation: Campus-Based Computational Research Support, is a consortium that brings together education and research institutions that are committed to the vision of advancing scientific discovery through a national network of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure Research and Education Facilitators (ACI-REFs).


Working together in a coordinated effort, the consortium is dedicated to the adoption of models and strategies to leverage the expertise and experiences of its members to maximize the impact of investment in research computing.


The consortium is forging a nationwide alliance of educators to empower local campus researchers to be more effective users of advanced cyberinfrastructure. In particular, the project seeks to work with the “long tail” of ACI users: those scholars and faculty members who traditionally have not benefitted from the power of massively scaled cluster computing, but who recognize that their research requires access to more compute power than can be provided by their desktop machines.

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